LARPs Written By Other Authors

That I Like Enough To Want To Run For Other Players

Will That Be All?

Author Graham Walmsley
More Details See Drive Thru RPG. I am running an expanded version of that game - the version of the game I played.
Where I Played It Consequences J, November 2016
Where I'm Running It Friday night at Intercon Q

In the last years of a British country house, the servants gather for dinner. We meet them three times, in 1928, 1931 and 1935, as their feelings for each other grow and change.

Will That Be All? is a game about love and relationships between servants, set against the backdrop of gathering war. It starts in the affluent 1920s and ends with the threat of war in the 1930s. We play in three acts, each lasting about an hour, in which you'll try to find romance.

There's a short amount of talking at the start of the game and between acts, in which we choose and change relationships. We'll keep this to a minimum, so we can start playing quickly. (The game isn't particularly "Nordic" and there isn't a full workshop or anything like that.)

This is an emotional and bittersweet game. Come prepared to have your heart filled with love or broken.

CONTENT ADVISORY: The characters aren't written as specifically gay, straight or anything else: you can choose who your character is attracted to. That said, you can't always choose who's attracted to you. It's a game that can embrace all kinds of relationships, so come prepared for that.

Players of any gender are welcome.

And here's a complex but important point about gender, which I know will matter to some people. The roles in the country house are strictly divided by gender: so, for example, the butler is seen as a male role. However, that doesn't mean that a character's gender must match the job role: for example, the butler could be played by a character who is, in fact, a woman or who doesn't identify definitively as male and female. If this is important to you, talk to me and I'm happy to accommodate.

Will That Be All? is set in the run-up to World War II. Towards the end of the game, there's some mention of the possibility that characters will die. The game mentions fascism briefly. It doesn't deal explicitly with anti-Semitism, although two characters have Jewish names, so the subject may come up: again, if this matters to you, talk to me and we can accommodate.

This game is suitable for players 18 and older. Younger players will be considered on a case by case basis, as there are parts that start as teenagers, but age into adulthood, with adult issues.

Questionnaire

Copy the text below in an editor, fill in your answers, and send it back to us as directed in the email from us about the LARP:

1. Name:

2. Game Day Phone Number:

3. How much LARPing experience do you have?

4. Please rank the following character descriptions on a scale:

Mrs Norton, Housekeeper, 40: In the War, you worked in a munitions factory. You put love letters in the crates. Once, a soldier found one and came to find you. It was intensely romantic. You’d love to find that level of intensity again. After the War, when men returned to the factories, you found work here. It gives the stability you need, but you often get tired.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Edelman, Lady's Maid, 29: In the War, you worked as an untrained nurse. You fell in love with a shell-shocked soldier, Adam, but broke it off when he hit you. After the War, you returned to service and found this job. These days, you tire of boys and prefer women’s company. You’d like to find a partner for long talks and who wouldn’t bother you too much for sex.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Peg, Housemaid, 19: You grew up on a farm, then spent the War in the Land Army growing vegetables. It taught you self-reliance. When you left the farm, this was the only job available. Like many farm girls, you’ve experimented with both men and women sexually. One day, you’d like to find someone to excite you and a life beyond this house.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Mrs Pine, Cook, 50: For years, you lived with a female companion, but she died of the Spanish Flu in 1919. Luckily, the Meltons took you on as cook, as they recalled your wartime work in a soup kitchen. You saw poverty in that kitchen and never want to experience it. One day, you would like another partner, both for company and to provide for you.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Chalky, Nurse, 61: You raised two generations of Melton children. Once they were grown, you stayed at the house, where you are well-liked. Yet you feel unnecessary, even ridiculous. Your childish manner conceals a fiery heart. You’d love to let those feelings out, with someone who can handle your passion.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Cress, Scullery Maid, 17: You spent the Great War as a child, playing on the streets of London. Growing up, you sold your body for money, but tired of rough men. Last week, you found this job, but you’d like to work somewhere classy, like a shop or office. You drink, dance and smoke and like people who enjoy those things too.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Boot, Stable Hand, 34: Born to a chambermaid, you never fitted into the servants’ world. Then, in the War, you worked with horses, and nobody cared what you looked like. You’d love to find a fellow outsider, who would accept you as you are. You wonder whether you could find someone with the loyalty and strength of your favourite horse.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Mr Goldberg, Butler, 45: In 1897, you entered Melton Hall as a young footman. You fought in the Great War, seeing horrors that made you a pacifist: you prefer reasoned discussion to conflict. You have never shared your bed, preferring quiet, companionable talks to intimacy. Often, you wonder if there is more to discover and if it is too late.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Mr Shilling, Valet, 39: In the War, you saw friends ripped apart. It left you wary of brash men, preferring women’s company and delighting in clothes and conversation. Yet you are lonely, neither fitting with men or women, servants or nobility. You want to find someone who sees your softer side and makes you feel at home.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Edward, First Footman, 35: In the trenches of the Great War you received a bullet in the shoulder blade, which still twinges agonisingly. Your officer, one of the Melton family, gave you this job. Having only slept with prostitutes, you long for romance. You’d like to talk and dance with pretty young things, then settle down with someone.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

James, Second Footman, 28: In 1911, you joined Melton Hall as a hallboy, working your way up to footman. You were too sickly to go to war, but losing friends left you wary of authority. You like politics and read the paper avidly. You make money by having sex with visitors, male and female. If you found the right person, you’d stop this and get married.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Mr Barraclough, Tutor, 31: Before the War, you were happily married. Yet the trenches made you hard to live with. You found this job and, while still married, have not seen your wife for years. You want a companion for a peaceful, normal life, yet you wonder who would want you. Certainly, any relationship would not be like your old marriage.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Reggie, Gardener, 52: You have minded the Melton’s garden for 30 years. It is harder since you got gassed during the War, which made you short of breath. One day soon, you may need to retire. You once loved a chambermaid, but she died while giving birth to your child. You’d like to find someone loving, to settle down with and care for each other.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Albert, Odd Man, 64: When Melton Hall was great, you were First Coachman. You served with pride, even when your memory went and they assigned you to odd jobs. Yet the world has changed. You wonder there is still a place for you. Can you share the joy, chatter, even the love that younger people enjoy? Can you find someone to share it with?

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Pip, Hallboy, 16: During the War, you grew up on a farm, where food was scarce. After the War, your parents bought a fish and chip shop, which you loved. You are scared of being hungry again. You like to joke and flirt, yet you’ve only kissed, nothing more. You’d like to explore further, yet also want someone reliable, to run the shop with.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Hillary, Chauffeuse, 37: As a child, the prettiness of girl’s clothes always felt alien to you. The War was your liberation: you drove ambulances, then the Meltons took you on. While you enjoy the transgression of taking a male role, you often feel like an oddity, whom people like but never get close to. You want someone to see you as the person you are.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Dot, Char, 48: When tuberculosis took your husband of many years, you needed work. While no-one could replace him, you hate to be alone, and wonder if you could find someone loving and kind. You mind your own business and often feel invisible. Should you be more outgoing? Or should others accept you as you are?

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Dee, Kitchen Maid, 31: You married a boy who died in the trenches. While you try to feel sorrow, you barely knew him. When the men took the jobs, you swallowed your pride and found work here. You are slow to trust, but loyal to those you do. You’d like someone of good character who you could have children with.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

Celia, Laundry Maid, 26: In the War, you nursed dying men. It left a hole inside you. But you try to move on, seeking joy and beauty in those you meet. You enjoy sex and know how to use contraceptives. This old house is damp and cold, but the people bring it to life. One day, you might marry, if somebody could live with the darkness inside you.

____ Love to Play; ____ Like to Play; ____ Will Play; ____ Don't Want to Play

5. What do you want to get out of this LARP?

6. Do you have any worries about this LARP? What can I do about them?

7. Do you have any disabilities, impairments or anything else I should know about? How can I accommodate them?